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He also joined a fraternity (he was the only black member), played guitar in a campus jazz band, and tutored jazz guitarists at a local high school. “I can never come back here.” Her friend started teasing her, asking how it had gone. Just before Thanksgiving, according to a federal lawsuit filed against the university by Bonsu’s attorney, Brett Lampiasi, R. went to the dean of students and filed a complaint against Bonsu. The police investigated and closed the case with no charges filed.

Listen to the audio version of this article: Feature stories, read aloud: download the Audm app for your i Phone. On January 12, 2015, Bonsu got an email from a school administrator informing him that a “very serious” allegation had been lodged against him and that until a hearing was held, he was subject to “interim restrictions”: He could not contact R.

Effective immediately, Bonsu was banned from all university housing and was allowed on campus only to attend classes.

His mother and an uncle drove up from Maryland to help him appeal his restrictions, but were largely unsuccessful.

M.’s name, he received a new interim restriction: a total ban from campus.

Bonsu’s lawsuit describes the period that followed as one of extreme stress, during which he lost weight, contracted pneumonia, and was forced to drop two courses because the restrictions placed on him precluded him from attending class during his midterm exams. By then he was living back home in Maryland, sick a second time with pneumonia and in a state of emotional collapse.

At many schools, the rules intended to protect victims of sexual assault mean students have lost their right to due process—and an accusation of wrongdoing can derail a person’s entire college education.

This is the first story in a three-part series examining how the rules governing sexual-assault adjudication have changed in recent years, and why some of those changes are problematic.

There he ran into another junior, whom I’ll call R. As she wrote, “It got more intense until finally I shifted so that I was straddling him.” She told him she wasn’t interested in intercourse and he said he was fine with that. wrote, “I got on my knees and started to give him a blow job.” After a short time, “I removed my mouth but kept going with my hand and realized just how high I was.” She wrote that she felt conflicted because she wanted to stop—she said she told him she was feeling uncomfortable and thought she needed to leave—but that she also felt bad about “working him up and then backing out.” (In Bonsu’s written account, he stated that R. said she needed to leave because she was concerned her friend might “barge in” on them.) The encounter continued for a few more minutes, during which, she wrote, he cajoled her to stay—“playfully” grabbing her arm at one point, and drawing her in to kiss—then ended with an exchange of phone numbers. The restrictions meant that Bonsu could no longer play with his jazz ensemble at a weekly Sunday brunch.

These rules proliferated during Barack Obama’s administration, as did threats of sanctions if schools didn’t follow them precisely.

The impulse behind them was noble and necessary—sexual assault is a scourge that should not be tolerated in any society, much less by institutions of higher learning.

Eventually he was accepted into the engineering program at the University of Maryland at Baltimore County, for the fall semester of 2016, a year and a half after he had left UMass.

He is on track to finally graduate from college in the fall of 2018.

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